Monday, August 7, 2017

Cumming and Post Road Libraries to Host Solar Eclipse Programs

We’re just 14 days away from being in the path of a solar eclipse! The sight is expected to be incredible, even though Forsyth County is just outside the path of totality.

Forsyth County Schools are delaying the release of students on Monday, August 21 until the eclipse passes, but two FCPL branches will also be hosting programs for patrons of all ages to gain a better understanding and viewing of this amazing natural phenomenon.

Total Eclipse of the Sun Celebration at the Post Road Library

Patrons of all ages are invited to the Post Road Library at 1:30 p.m. on August 21 to view educational displays, make eclipse-themed crafts, and watch a live stream of the eclipse in the library’s Hot Spot. At 2:15 p.m., step outside to watch the eclipse with special safety glasses (provided by the library, while supplies last).

Updated August 15, 2017: Tickets for glasses will be given out at 1:00 p.m. and glasses at 1:30 p.m. One pair of glasses will be given per family or group.

Solar Eclipse Viewing at the Cumming Library

Patrons of all ages may also visit the Cumming Library at 2:00 p.m. on August 21 to watch solar science videos, see educational displays, and make eclipse-themed crafts. At 2:20 p.m., step outside to watch the eclipse with special safety glasses (provided by the library, while supplies last).

Free Eclipse Glasses No Longer Available 

With support from Google and the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Space Science Institute's STAR_Net initiative distributed ISO-compliant safe solar eclipse glasses to libraries all across the U.S. and Forsyth County Public Library received a limited supply of eclipse glasses to distribute to patrons and to use at programs on the day of the eclipse.

Our supply of glasses for the general public has been exhausted and the only way to receive glasses from the library now is to attend one of the programs listed above at the Cumming and Post Road Libraries.

Finding Eclipse Glasses

It is unsafe to look directly at the sun, even during a partial eclipse, as we’ll experience locally. If you’d like to purchase your own eclipse glasses, NASA and the American Astronomical Society warn consumers that only eclipse glasses verified by an accredited testing laboratory to meet the ISO 12312-2 international safety standard are safe to use.

The American Astronomical Society provides a list of reputable manufacturers and retailers of eclipse glasses and solar filters for telescopes, binoculars, and cameras. STAR_Net also lists other safe ways of viewing the eclipse.

No comments:

Post a Comment